Some post #MarchforScience thoughts.

See the bottom of this post for a collection of great #MarchForScience tweets, images, and my livestream of the London march!

Foremost, thanks to everyone who came out and stood up to show their support. I think it is hard not to look at the worldwide crowds and feel an up-welling of pride and hope. If nothing else the feeling of solidarity, and of sending a loud message that we will not accept a post-evidence society, is well worth the efforts of the organizers and marchers. I just wanted to try and write down a few thoughts I had about the marches, which I’m sure are shared by many others.

Yesterday I think many of us saw, first hand and for the first time, that Science has real people power. Like any other special interest group, we can band together and organize to amplify the reach and influence of our message. Ultimately science requires the creation of a space that is free from politics, and the creation of that space is itself a political act. It is my hope that yesterday planted the seeds of organization that can grow into a movement. We can’t except the general public to stand up for us; it is indeed time to work to ensure a society where science and evidence-based policy flourish.

That being said, I’m sure many of you are also wondering what, if anything yesterday will really achieve. I also have the worry that these marches may ultimately act as another form of ‘slacktivism’, exorcising our anxieties while ultimately achieving little. I can’t speak for the worldwide marches, but I did feel that more could have been done to try and carry the momentum forward. It is a bold first step for scientists to put aside their self-assumed neutrality and stand up for their own cause. At the London march you could feel an almost palpable unease or cautiousness in the march yesterday. It was perhaps the most quiet, calm, and reserved political march i’ve ever participated in – and of course, also a lot of fun. Ultimately if we are going to effect change, this can only be the first step. We need to begin to organize into effective political action communities that can lobby on our behalf.

This also means addressing some of the infighting that arose during the course of the organization of the march. Science cannot turn a blind eye to diversity, or our own issues therein. Effective political action requires building a broad based progressive movement that is inclusive and champions a set of values that does not exclude persons of color, LGBT, or other minorities. I recognize that there are already growing pains; many scientists feel science should inherently be apolitical. But what we’ve seen is that, our work will be politicized no matter what stance we take on it. My hope is that the marches yesterday will embolden us to reach out to community organizers, to build a strong and evidence based movement for political reform. Let yesterday be the planting of a seed, from which a thousand flowers may bloom.


Here are some fun tweets and links from the march:

Clearly DC scientists had a blast! Love this video.

Amazing turn out in Seattle:

Sine game on point:

DC:

Truth!

Amazing aerial shot:

20k marchers in Philly!

Hello, my name is Science!

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